Rob Dino DeNault - Century 21 North Shore/Storrs & DeNault



Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 4/17/2018

When you decide to sell your home, thereís a long list of things that youíll need to do from finding a real estate agent to making repairs around the home. Itís nice to have a to-do list handy to help you figure out what you need to do and when throughout the course of the sale of your home. 


Find Out The Estimated Value Of Your Home


You should do a quick search online to see what your property is valued at. Some websites even have the number of views that your property has gotten over its lifetime on the site. This will give you an idea of how much you might get for the sale of your home as well as how much interest there may be in buying the home to begin with. If you see what your, home has listed in a basic online search, youíll be able to tell what needs to be updated when the home is actually listed by your realtor.   


Get Things Fixed


If there have been issues in the home, you should work on getting them fixed. Youíll also need to know what has happened in the home over the years in order to put together a proper disclosure. Has the basement flooded? Did you face an electrical fire?  All of these problems need to be listed. You can also disclose what you did to remedy the issues. The buyer has a right to know and understand that they are moving in under good conditions. 


Learn About Potential Real Estate Agents


Itís so important to hire the right agent when youíre selling your home. You are getting a return on your initial investment, so you want it to be a good one! Youíll also want to know that you have someone who will be there to do home showings, process paperwork, and be your advocate throughout the process. You can contact various references that real estate agents provide and ask how they felt about the agentís work. 


Find Out How Your Home Will Be Marketed


In Todayís technology-based world, there are so many ways that a home can be marketed. This includes the use of websites, social media, open houses, video tours, and photos. Your agent should be well-versed in all of these areas, or be able to hire people who do know how to best use these areas of marketing. Every avenue that is used to get buyers for your home is beneficial to you as a seller.



Understanding the process of how a home is sold can help you to be prepared when youíre ready to sell.





Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 4/10/2018

Although your home gym has helped you stay in shape for many years, packing your dumbbells, an elliptical and other exercise equipment prior to moving day may prove to be exhausting. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of packing your exercise equipment.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you prepare your exercise equipment for moving day.

1. Handle Your Weights with Care

Weights come in many shapes and sizes, and you should allocate plenty of time and resources to ensure your weights won't move while in transit.

For small weight plates and dumbbells, you can wrap these weights in packing paper and place them in a small box. However, you should try to avoid putting too many weights in a single box.

If you have heavy weights and barbells, you should wrap these weights in packing paper and place them directly on the floor of your moving day vehicle. Secure the weights with rope or straps, and you can keep the weights in place.

2. Take Photographs of Your Exercise Equipment

Let's face it Ė disassembling an elliptical, treadmill or other exercise equipment can be challenging. Perhaps even worse, putting your exercise equipment back together at your new home may be virtually impossible, particularly for those who struggle to stay organized.

Before you disassemble any exercise equipment, take a photograph of the equipment itself. Capture images of your exercise equipment from all angles, and you'll be better equipped than ever before to properly put this equipment back together once you reach your new address.

Also, keep all screws, bolts and other small exercise equipment parts in a plastic bag. You can attach this bag to the equipment itself to avoid the danger of losing these parts during your move.

Don't forget to keep track of the steps that you follow to disassemble exercise equipment too. That way, you'll know exactly what you'll need to do to quickly reassemble your exercise equipment.

3. Get Help from Family Members and Friends

Exercise equipment can be large, heavy and difficult to move on your own. Thus, you should not hesitate to reach out to family members and friends to help you safely pack and move your exercise equipment from Point A to Point B.

Furthermore, professional moving companies are available to help you transport exercise equipment to your new house. A moving company employs friendly, professionally trained staff members who are happy to help you simplify the process of moving your exercise equipment to any location, at any time.

If you need extra assistance prior to moving day, you may want to contact a real estate agent as well. In addition to helping you buy or sell a residence, a real estate agent can offer expert moving tips, put you in touch with top-rated moving companies in your area and much more.

Get your exercise equipment ready for your upcoming move Ė use the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble packing and moving your exercise equipment to your new house.





Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 4/3/2018

Technology is getting smarter. Nowadays it seems everything has AI built-in. And why not? It makes your home have a clever assistant in every room of your home without the expense of paying hourly wages. Hereís how to have a smarter kitchen, because letís be honest this is the room where we can always use an extra set of hands.

The Mr.Coffee coffee pot can start from your phone. Letís be honest the alarm feature most pots boast are greatÖ but not everyone has the same schedule every day. This pot allows you to create a custom schedule that matches your own. Have a fresh, hot cup waiting for you right when you get out of bed when you wake up at 5 am on a Monday and 7 on a Wednesday.

Want more control of your appliances from your phone? Crock-pot now has a slow cooker you can adjust settings with from your phone. Control temperature and cook times from anywhere so if youíre running late getting home it wonít be too an overcooked meal.

Both the Mr.Coffee and Crock Pot devices run off of Wemo technology. While both of these devices have built-in tech that doesn't mean the fun has to end there. Wemo offers devices you can plug into any outlet so you can control any appliance from your phone. With the Wemo app set lights to turn on for your family to come home to a well lit welcoming home even on a Winter night.

You can also use Google Assistant, Alexis or Siri (with the necessary extender) to control these devices and even set timers and reminders. Ask your smart speaker to set a timer for dinner, add an item to your grocery list or that you want to use that hamburger in the freezer by Friday. You can even ask for help with ingredient conversions. If you like to listen to music while cooking you donít need to worry about touching controls if you want to skip a song, turn the music down or up. Just ask your assistant to do it for you, and it will happily oblige.

Have fun with your pooch from anywhere with the Furbo camera. With camera, access make sure your dog isnít up to no good while youíre away. Use the microphone to remind them the rules still apply while you are away. The best part, however, is that you can reward them for being well-behaved, or cute, with the built-in treat dispenser.

Keep your home safe with the Nest Protect system, a smart smoke, and carbon monoxide alarm. This alarm alerts your phone as soon as it detects signs of danger. It also warns you with a human-like voice when the alarm is about to go off so you arenít startled by the typical high pitched screaming of alarms.




Tags: kitchen   home technology   tech  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 3/27/2018

For some home buyers, a home older than a certain date is automatically off the table. But for others the more history a home has the more interested they become in placing a bid. If you are in the latter camp, this article is for you. Owning a historic home isnít for everyone and there are a few things you should know before beginning your search.  

One disappointment for potential homebuyers can be the limitations historic districts or easements put in place. They can limit what you can and cannot do aesthetically to your home such as paint colors and architectural changes, especially to the front of the house. If you find yourself dreaming of new siding colors, tearing down walls or building additions to make the house ďjust rightĒ, you may find yourself disappointed. These are common changes that donít go beyond the drawing board due to limitations in place and can even bring down the value of your home.   

On the plus side, because of these rules in place, the area probably has an active neighborhood association. You can expect well taken care of homes on your street that stay authentic to the historical charm you so love. Youíll have a community to turn to when youíre looking to gain knowledge on renovating and repairing your home. Chances are pretty high they have had to make similar repairs and know the best contractors in the area or where to source materials youíll need.

And this is great because youíll want to be prepared for repairs throughout the years to maintain your home. When renovating itís important that you use the right materials as not doing so could damage your home in the long run if they donít play well with your homeís existing infrastructure. For this reason, youíll want to hire historic home specialists and preservationists when it comes time to make repairs.

In historic homes, repair bills can add up especially if youíve taken on a ďprojectĒ home. Take your current and projected income into consideration and if youíll have the ability to keep up with costs. No one wants to live in a permanent construction zone and this can very well be the case if you run out of funds. You may want to consider an FHA 203k loan, aka a rehab mortgage, to help cover these costs especially any large ones youíll need in the beginning. Some states also offer grants and tax deductions for repairs and maintenance on historic homes.

For each home you consider, hire an inspector that specializes in historical houses and therefore well versed on what to look out for and what the common (and uncommon) warning signs are. Be on the alert for asbestos, mold and lead paint especially if you have or plan to have small children. And know when to walk away, homes with structural issues are usually not worth their while and the issues youíre sure to have with time.

Purchasing a historical home is more than just a buying a house. Itís buying a piece of history with memories imprinted into its floors and walls. It is for this reason you also want to ensure those memories are not toxic or unsafe for your family. This house buying, perhaps more than any other, is one best-given plenty of time to find ďThe OneĒ thatís perfect for you.  





Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 3/20/2018

Buying a house is one of the biggest decisions you will make in your life, both financially and otherwise. Just like retirement funds, buying a home and paying off your mortgage can be a significant long term investment.

It will take time to prepare for buying a home. Youíll need to build credit, save for a downpayment, and find a degree of financial stability to ensure you can pay your mortgage each month.

This article is catered towards homebuyers who have already met those prerequisites and are ready to jump in and start hunting for houses. For those of you curious about exactly how long it will take from the time you view your first house until you close the deal on your new home, read on.

Home buying by the numbers

On average, buyers can spend 30-60 days looking at homes and anywhere between 15 and 60 days longer to close on a home. Of course, these numbers depend on a lot of things such as how eager you are to buy, how  effectively youíre able to work with agents and sellers, and on just sheer luck.

How can I speed up the process?

Preparation is the number one thing to focus on when it comes to buying a home. First, double check your finances. This means taking time to run a credit report and challenging any errors that may be lowering your credit.

Next, take time to sit down and discuss with your family (if applicable) your moving goals. Are you trying to move closer to someoneís place of business or to a particular school district? Having these discussions will make it easier to eliminate houses and to narrow your search, saving you time in the long run.

Before you start looking at homes, itís a good idea to being the process of getting preapproved for a loan. This can take weeks, so you want to get this step done early to know where you stand when it comes time to start house hunting.

Next youíll want to meet with a real estate agent who has extensive knowledge of your area. Theyíll send you listings that meet your criteria, stylistically and financially.

The offer and closing

Now that youíve found the right home, youíll have to enter the next part of the process: making an offer and closing. This step isnít entirely within your control. Some sellers will delay in accepting, others will reject, and others will give a counter offer. The best way to save time on this step is to give a reasonable offer from the start, showing the seller that you are serious and worth negotiating with.

Once your offer has been accepted, your work is still far from over. There will be a lot of paperwork to fill out, but youíll also have to schedule a home inspection to ensure there are no problems with the home that you havenít already been made aware of.

Once all of these steps are complete, you will have purchased a new home.