Rob Dino DeNault - Century 21 North Shore/Storrs & DeNault



Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 9/27/2016

imagesGrowing Horseradish In The Home Garden Horseradish is a root vegetable that earned its name to set it apart from the ordinary garden radish used in salads and slaws. History also reports that horses are fond of the pungent greenery. In ancient Greece, the root was known as “wild radish” with the leaves and root prized as an antiseptic, diuretic and stimulant. Because of its exceptionally high vitamin C content, horseradish is a centuries-old cure for scurvy. Most folks think of horseradish as a spicy condiment, often served with beef, especially prime rib or as a compliment to seafood. The root of the horseradish, thinly sliced and pickled with herbs in vinegar, is a famous meat sauce in cultures around the world. Horseradish Cultivation Native to Europe, horseradish is a perennial herb, with huge, deep green to yellow-gold elongated leaves. The plant reaches a height of from two to four feet at maturity and does well in a sunny spot along a fence line. Horseradish is best planted in a corner in well-composted clay soil where it will receive lots of moisture. Horseradish needs one to two inches of water a week, so remember to water liberally during periods of drought. Horseradish grows well in United States Plant Hardiness Zones 3 through 7. Reserve this spot in the garden for horseradish only, as even the tiniest root left at harvest time will develop into a plant. Once planted, you will have an endless supply of horseradish both for personal use and to share with friends and family. Horseradish plants can be started from seeds, but the easiest way to establish horseradish in the garden is to purchase a couple of established plants online or from a local home and garden supply store. In early spring, turn the soil, breaking up all clumps. Add garden compost and aged herbivore manure (cow, horse, pig, sheep, chicken, or goat) and work well into the soil. Water well to saturate the soil. Plant horseradish after all danger of frost is past. Plant twelve to eighteen inches deep. Space plants one to two feet apart. In the spring, the delicate new leaves are a tasty addition to a salad or slaw or use a few springs of fresh leaf to flavor to a soup or stew. Plan to harvest your horseradish in the fall, before the first frost. Dig the roots and remove excess soil. Store in a root cellar in damp sand or a sealed plastic bag in the refrigerator. Grate as needed. If you have an abundance of horseradish root, grind and pickle with apple cider vinegar, a sprig of fresh rosemary and a sprig of fresh thyme. Add honey or raw sugar to taste. Bring mixture to a mild boil and simmer until thicken and translucent. Pack in sterile hot glass jars and seal. Water bath for 15-minutes. Store for enjoyment during the winter. Homemade horseradish sauce is a worthy condiment to serve with a country ham.




Tags: horseradish   herb   plant  
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Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 9/20/2016

As the old saying goes, “You only have one chance to make a great first impression.” – Front Door And Entryway The entryway and front door should be in immaculate condition. This is the entry to your home and reflects the personality of the property. Polish the door and entryway lighting fixtures until they gleam. If the front door requires refinishing or repainting, be sure to freshen thing up before you put the house on the market. If you have a nameplate or personalized address plaque, remove it. You want to depersonalize the entryway. Potential buyers may find it hard to visualize the property as their “new home” if it is “branded” with your personal decorations. Install a fresh doormat. You can always take it with you when you leave, however an attractive fresh mat helps make the home look tidy and well maintained: so replace the old one. Dependent on the season, a couple of pots of fresh flowers or seasonal greenery are a nice compliment to an attractive entryway. Make sure the key you provide for the realtor works smoothly in your entryway lock. When an agent uses the key to show the property, you do not want potential buyers to have to wait while the realtor tries to get the key to work properly. Yard And Landscape “Spruce-up” your landscape by making sure the lawn is mowed, leaves are raked and trees trimmed. During winter months make sure the sidewalks are shoveled and free from snow and ice. Remove all clutter from the driveway and front and back yard. Park extra vehicles, boats and RV’s offsite. You do not want the driveway to look cramped or indicate that there is a lack of parking space. Remove yard ornaments. You might love to collect frogs or gnomes, but they may not be to everyone’s taste. If you have children’s playground equipment or a swing set, it is also best to remove them and place in storage as they tend to make the yard appear cramped and crowded, especially if your backyard is small already. Clean the gutters and make sure they are in good repair before listing the property. If gutters are hanging or window shutters are in need of repair, it makes it appear that the entire property is in a state of disrepair. Lighting While your property is on the market for sale, it is a good idea to remember to keep the exterior of the house well lighted so that it appears bright, cheerful and inviting. Make sure than lights come on at dusk and remain on until late evening. Often prospective homebuyers will drive by a property prior to making an appointment to view the home with their realtor. If the home is dark, dim and uninviting, the buyer is likely to reject the property before seeing the many beautiful interior amenities.




Tags: Real Estate  
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Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 9/16/2016


50 Moore Rd, Ashburnham, MA 01430

Single-Family

$424,900
Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Beautiful Contemporary Colonial..Open Concept, Cathedral ceilings, Hardwood, Tile, Wainscoting, Formal Dining Room, Large open Kitchen with Dining Area, Granite Counters, Cathedral Family room that leads to a lovely patio area, First Floor Master Bedroom with separate office or Baby's Room, Large walk in closets lead to a beautiful Master Bath with Elevated Jetted Tub, Separate Shower and two vanity's, Spacious 2nd Floor Playroom (could be 4th bedroom) , Large 3 car garage, and a spacious basement with walk-out. In-ground sprinkler, Central Air, Generator Hook-up, Laundry room with utility sink and ironing board, Propane Fireplace in Living room.
Open House
Sunday
September 18 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Spectacular Home. A must See!
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 50 Moore Rd, Ashburnham, MA 01430    Get Directions

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Categories: Open House  


Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 9/16/2016


50 Moore Rd, Ashburnham, MA 01430

Single-Family

$424,900
Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Beautiful Contemporary Colonial..Open Concept, Cathedral ceilings, Hardwood, Tile, Wainscoting, Formal Dining Room, Large open Kitchen with Dining Area, Granite Counters, Cathedral Family room that leads to a lovely patio area, First Floor Master Bedroom with separate office or Baby's Room, Large walk in closets lead to a beautiful Master Bath with Elevated Jetted Tub, Separate Shower and two vanity's, Spacious 2nd Floor Playroom (could be 4th bedroom) , Large 3 car garage, and a spacious basement with walk-out. In-ground sprinkler, Central Air, Generator Hook-up, Laundry room with utility sink and ironing board, Propane Fireplace in Living room.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Categories: Price Change  


Posted by Rob Dino DeNault on 9/13/2016

When you think of planting new flowers around your home, you may think of the spring as the time for major planting and landscaping projects. Surprisingly, the fall is actually the perfect season for planting. There’s so many different kinds of plants that thrive in the cooler weather. From perennials to trees to shrubs to vegetables, fall has it all. You just need to know what to plant in this thriving season that will be perfect for cooler weather. There’s so many different kinds of plants that are great for the fall, this article will surprise you. The benefits of planting in the fall are many. The cooler temperatures are better for both the plants and you as a gardener. You can spend more time outdoors since the temperature is more suitable. Because the soil itself is still warm, it allows the roots of plants to grow all the way up until the time that the ground freezes later in the season. As a bonus, when everything is blooming during the spring, so will your fall flowers. In the spring, you need to wait to begin planting until the soil is warmer, which can take some time. This actually means that there’s more good days for planting in the fall season than in the spring. The spring has notoriously unpredictable weather, making planting in this season even harder. Just be sure that you provide your fall plants with enough water. This usually isn't a problem considering the fall has quite a bit of rain. Pests and plant diseases are at a yearly low as well, making it a great time for planting. The other bonus to the fall is that you don’t need fertilizer. It’s not the right season to fertilize in most cases. If you weren’t already aware, you need to stop fertilizing before the end of summer for most of your plants. The type of growth that fertilizer promotes can be stopped abruptly by winter weather, causing harm to the plant. If you’re planning on planting in the fall, try to plant about a month and a half before the first frost, which usually hits in late October. Vegetables that can be planted in the fall include: Cabbage Kale Lettuce Rutabaga Spinach Carrots Brussel Sprouts Swiss Chard Radishes Broccoli The fall is actually the best time to plant your turf grass and clean up your lawn as well. Blue grass, fescue and ryegrass need to be planted at this time. These grasses are all cool weather grasses and should be fertilized in early September and again later in the fall before the frost hits. This will give your grass a boost for an earlier green burst in the spring. Warm season grasses shouldn’t be fertilized during their dormant months. Hopefully, you’re inspired to plant during this fall season!